King's Lynn Archaeologists

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Guild hall in Kings Lynn 02

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Facts for Kings Lynn:

Kings Lynn Location: Norfolk, Eastern England, England, UK.

Kings Lynn Postcode: PE30

Kings Lynn Dialling Code: 01553

Kings Lynn Population: 42,800 (Census 2011)

Ordnance Survey Map Reference for Kings Lynn: TF62390

First identified as Lynn or Lin (and later as Bishop's Lynn), the dynamic town of Kings Lynn in Norfolk was previously one of the most vital maritime ports in Britain. King's Lynn presently has a populace of about 42,000 and lures in a fairly large amount of visitors, who go to learn about the story of this lovely place and also to savor its countless fine tourist attractions and live entertainment events. The name of the town (Lynn) derives from the Celtic term for "lake or pool" and undoubtedly indicates the reality that this place was in the past engulfed by a considerable tidal lake.

Kings Lynn lies on the Wash in Norfolk, the noticable bite out of England's east coast where King John is alleged to have lost all his gold treasures in twelve fifteen. He had been entertained by the burghers of Lynn (as it was then named), back then a flourishing port, but was scuppered by a nasty high tide as he made his way to the west over dangerous marshes on the way to Newark and the jewels were lost forever. Not long after this, John died of a surfeit of peaches (or a surfeit of lampreys) dependant upon which narrative you believe. In today's times the town was always a natural centre, the main route for commerce between the East Midlands and East Anglia, the train terminus of the London, Cambridge, Ely main line, and also the bridging point which joins 'high' Norfolk heading in the direction of the city of Norwich in the east, and 'low' Norfolk, the flat marsh and fen lands to the south of the Wash.

Kings-lynn-river-great-ouseThe royal connections with King's Lynn are much stronger in today's times when compared with the times of King John. Several miles away to the north-east is Sandringham, an important tourist attraction and one of the Queen's personal estates. The town of King's Lynn itself itself lies predominantly on the eastern bank of the River Great Ouse estuary. A lot of the streets near the river, notably those around the St Margaret's Minster Church, have remained very much the same as they were a couple of centuries ago.

If the town has a focal point it would likely be the historical Tuesday Market Place into which King Street leads, particularly in the past several years since the old Corn Exchange has been developed into a key centre of entertainment. The majority of the houses and buildings around the Tuesday Market Place are Victorian or earlier. These buildings include the beautiful Duke's Head Hotel, built in 1683, and a grade II listed building since 1951, the Corn Exchange (1854) and the Globe Hotel (originally put up in 1650).

The Historical Past of King's Lynn Norfolk - Possibly at first a Celtic community, and unquestionably eventually an Saxon village it was mentioned just as Lun in the 1086 Domesday Book, and controlled by Bishop Almer of Elmham. The town was only called King's Lynn in the sixteenth century, and had previously been known as Bishop's Lynn (and Lynn before this), the Bishop's aspect of the name was administered because it was at that time owned by a Bishop, who set up a Benedictine priory there in the late eleventh century, and it was the Bishop who first allowed the town the legal right to hold a street market in 1101. It was additionally at roughly this time that the Church of St Margaret was built.

The town progressively grew to become a key commerce hub and port, with merchandise like salt, wool and grain exported via the port. By the time the 14th century arrived, Bishop's Lynn was among the primary ports in the British Isles and a great deal of commerce was done with the Hanseatic League members (Baltic and German traders), with the Hanseatic Warehouse in St Margaret's Lane being erected for them in the late fifteenth century.

Bishop's Lynn struggled with a pair of huge catastrophes during the fourteenth century, firstly in the form of a dreadful fire which demolished most of the town, and the second in the shape of the Black Death, a terrible plague which resulted in the the loss of close to fifty percent of the town's population in the period 1348-49. In 1537, during the reign of Henry 8th, Bishop's Lynn came under the control of the monarch instead of a bishop and was subsequently identified as King's Lynn, the next year Henry also shut down the Benedictine Priory during his Dissolution of the Monasteries (1536-1541).

At the time of Civil War (1642 to 1651), the town actually fought on both sides, firstly it backed parliament, but subsequently changed allegiance and was captured by Parliamentarians when it was beseiged for 3 weeks. In the following two centuries the town's value as a port decreased along with the downturn of the wool exporting industry, although it did still continue exporting grain and importing iron and timber to a substantially lesser degree. The town of King's Lynn on top of that impacted by the rise of western ports like Bristol, which boomed after the discovery of the Americas.

The Lattice House Inn, King's Lynn - geograph.org.uk - 1589499Clearly there was nonetheless a decent amount of local and coastal business to keep the port in business over these harder times and later King's Lynn flourished yet again with imports of wine arriving from France, Portugal and Spain. Besides that the exporting of farm produce grew following the fens were drained during the seventeenth century, additionally, it established a significant shipbuilding industry. The rail line came to the town in 1847, driving more prosperity, trade and visitors to the town. The resident population of King's Lynn grew appreciably during the nineteen sixties mainly because it became a London overflow town.

The town can be accessed from the A149, the A10 or the A17, it's approximately 38 miles from Norfolk's capital Norwich and 94 miles from London. It may also be got to by train, the most handy international airport to King's Lynn is Norwich International (46 miles) a drive of about an hour.

A selection of Kings Lynn streets and roads: Mountbatten Road, Long Lane, Queen Elizabeth Drive, Fir Close, Toll Bar Corner, Pleasant Place, Exeter Crescent, Horton Road, Mill Hill, Vicarage Lane, Water End Lane, Ayre Way, Marsh Lane, Napier Close, Caravan Site, St Georges Terrace, Folgate Lane, Brummel Close, Stocklea Road, Clifford Burman Close, Hawthorn Close, Wallington, Craemar Close, Gibbet Lane, Lodge Lane, Howard Close, Adelaide Avenue, Mill Road, Brook Road, Segrave Road, Collins Lane, Linden Road, Robin Kerkham Way, Water Lane, Catch Bottom, Orchard Lane, Broadgate Lane, Nursery Close, Mill Common, Kendle Way, Norwich Road, Sidney Street, Woodgate Way, Old Vicarage Park, Grafton Close, Wynnes Lane, Bishops Terrace, Beechwood Court, Kenside Road, Legge Place, Drunken Drove.

Attractions, places of interest, things to do and places to visit in and around Kings Lynn: Gooderstone Water Gardens and Nature Trail, Gressenhall Farm and Workhouse, Paint Me Ceramics, Iceni Village, BlackBeards Adventure Golf, Castle Acre Castle, Hunstanton Beach, Oxburgh Hall, Searles Sea Tours, Pensthorpe Nature Reserve & Gardens, Fun Farm, The Play Barn, Strikes, Mr Gs Bowling Centre, Captain Willies Activity Centre, Boston Bowl, Green Britain Centre, Peckover House, St James Swimming Centre, Metheringham Swimming Pool, Greyfriars Tower, Walpole Water Gardens, Elgood Brewery, Duke's Head Hotel, Tales of the Old Gaol House, Play 2 Day, Lincolnshire", Blackborough End Equestrian Centre, St Georges Guildhall, Thorney Heritage Museum, Snettisham Beach.

For your trip to the East of England and Kings Lynn you are able to arrange hotels and holiday accommodation at the most cost effective rates by using the hotels search facility offered at the right hand side of this page.

It is easy to check out much more in regard to the town & neighbourhood at this excellent website: Kings Lynn.

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Must Watch Video - Step Back in Time and See King's Lynn 1940's to 1970's

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This information and facts should also be helpful for nearby districts ie : Watlington, Saddle Bow, Fair Green, Walpole Cross Keys, North Runcton, Long Sutton, Ashwicken, Gayton, Wiggenhall St Peter, Lutton, West Lynn, Castle Rising, Tilney All Saints, West Winch, Sutton Bridge, South Wootton, Runcton Holme, Terrington St Clement, Middleton, Snettisham, Tower End, Sandringham, Heacham, Bawsey, Babingley, Tottenhill Row, North Wootton, Gaywood, Leziate, Tottenhill, Dersingham, West Newton, Ingoldisthorpe, East Winch, Clenchwarden, Setchey, Downham Market, Hunstanton, Hillington, West Bilney . LOCAL MAP - AREA WEATHER

If you was pleased with this review and guide to the seaside resort of Kings Lynn in Norfolk, you very well might find some of our other resort and town websites handy, possibly the guide to Wymondham (Norfolk), or alternatively our website about Maidenhead. To inspect one or more of these sites, just click on the relevant town name. We hope to see you back before too long. Various other spots to see in Norfolk include Great Yarmouth, Norwich and Heacham (Norfolk).